Crosby Rambling Club visits Arnside

Last weekend I was out with my local Rambling Club on a visit to Arnside situated on the estuary of the River Kent

29 Arnside

Today Arnside has a genteel feel about it and it is hard to believe that a couple of centuries ago it was a thriving port. The Kent Estuary provided the only port in the old county of Westmorland. Coal and iron-ore were landed at Arnside and Milnthorpe and cloth exported. All that came to an end with the improvement of the road structure and the building of the Lancaster Canal and the arrival of the railway. The silting up of the estuary and construction of the railway viaduct means that only small sailing boats can now navigate the waters.

We began our walk along the promenade before our steady climb up to Arnside Knott. As we gained height we could look across the estuary to the Lake District Fells with the snow glinting on the Scafell and Coniston range.

40 Steady climb

It was pleasant walking and surprisingly mild after the past couple of days.

32

We saw some Highland Breed cattle which despite their fearsome appearance were very tame.

37 Highland Breed

At the top of Arnside Knott we saw the remains of the Knotted Trees.

42 Arnside Knott

Two trees were knotted together as saplings and grew up entwined with each other. Unfortunately they have now almost rotted away. Although Arnside Knott is only 522 ft in height there are marvellous views from the summit. I have stitched a couple of images together to give a panoramic view looking over to the Lake District.

Panorama from Arnside Knott

We now headed towards Arnside Tower, one of several pele-towers build as protection against the marauding Scots.

49 Arnside Tower

Arnside Tower was built by the de Broughton family about 1340. It was badly damaged by fire in 1602 but w2as restored and occupied until 1690. It then fell into neglect and now the structure is unsafe.

50 Arnside Tower

We continued on a path along the edge of woodland to cross the railway to the hamlet of Waterslack. After recrossing the railway we walked through Eaves Wood to reach Elmslack and then followed paths and lanes to reach Cove Road. After passing through a couple of caravan parks we reached the coast. The next mile was along the cliff top path. The scenery was brilliant but you needed to keep your eyes on the ground. It was not the place to slip.

52 Clifftop Path

56

Turning back inland we walked along forest paths before dropping down to the promenade at Arnside. Looking behind us we could see that the sun had finally appeared to give us a lovely sunset.

 

58 End of the walk

60 End of the day

We had done 10 miles but were still back in time to enjoy a pint of the local “Fighting Cocks” beer before our journey home.

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About crosbyman66

My aim is to create a photo diary of my walks and my travels. I have two main hobbies, walking and photography and these complement each other. I am a senior citizen, what used to be called an old age pensioner, but I don't feel old. Since retirement I have had more time to pursue my hobbies and the opportunity to travel more. My philosophy now is - Do what you can, while you can. My other interests are fine wines and keeping fit. These may not complement each other but keep me happy.
This entry was posted in Crosby Rambling Club, Lake District, Local History, Walks. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Crosby Rambling Club visits Arnside

  1. Marilyn says:

    Great photos, Alan. It was a good walk with pleasant weather!

  2. Pauline says:

    Brilliant write up and photos brings it all back.

  3. Beautiful images in that clear winter light.

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