Brunt Knott and Ulgraves.

536 Panorama from Ulgraves

                                                      Panorama from Ulgraves

I’m out with Crosby Rambling Club in a quiet corner of the Lake District. I’m going to attempt the “A” party walk led by Roger and the plan is to visit two of Wainwright’s outlying fells, Brunt Knott and Ulgraves.

We started our walk from Staveley where we paused to look at the weir on the River Kent.

502 The weir at Staveley

As we climbed up from the village we were surrounded by thick mist and after passing Brunt Knott farm we were on the open fell. There was a path of sorts but we left it to climb up to the summit of Brunt Knott at 427 m. (1093ft). The views were non existent.

506 Approaching Brunt Knott

508 Summit of Brunt Knott

We now had more rough walking through heather heading eastwards towards Ulgraves. We passed and interesting pool with a dry stone wall running through it, no-one wanted to test how deep it was.

510 Pool with a wall

Our route now followed a wall and in places it was quite wet. We made a diversion to one of several nameless peaks in the area. Jim posed for a photo on the summit with his little teddy bear mascot. There was no cairn just a single rock.

513 Jim and Teddy at the unnamed peak

Route finding in the mist was tricky as there was little sign of a path. Was it a dangerous place.

515 Danger

We visited a second nameless peak and unfortunately “Teddy” got left behind. I wonder if he is lonely. We must go back on a rescue mission.

Soon it was time for lunch and the mist had lifted and the sun had come out.

519 Here comes the sun

We were on a clear track but still had a steep climb to the summit of Ulgraves at 333m (1093 ft). we passed an impressive dry stone wall and a lovely small tarn,

522 Dry stone wall

526 Reflections

The summit of Ulgraves was beautiful. We could look along the length of Longsleddale.

527 Roger on Ulgraves

529 Ulgraves

From this vantage point on the edge of the Lake District we could look west to see many of the higher peaks. The valley at Windermere was still full of mist, but we could enjoy the sunshine and some lovely cloud formations.

531 Jim at the summit of Ulgraves

Our return route led us over Potter Fell to the reservoir at Gurnall Dubs which was very photogenic.

549 Gurnall Dubs

553 Gurnall Dubs

A clear track then led us to the larger reservoir at Potters Tarn. These two reservoirs did not provide drinking water – their purpose was to supply water power for the mills at Bowston and Cowan head.

555 Towards Potters Tarn 

Heading down from the tarn we passed the outlet of Ghyll Pool reservoir, another chance for a photo

556 Weir at Ghyll Pool

The final section of the walk was alongside the fast flowing River Kent.

561 Alongside the River Kent

We were back in Staveley with plenty of time to relax and enjoy a pint of real ale before our return journey.

Advertisements

About crosbyman66

My aim is to create a photo diary of my walks and my travels. I have two main hobbies, walking and photography and these complement each other. I am a senior citizen, what used to be called an old age pensioner, but I don't feel old. Since retirement I have had more time to pursue my hobbies and the opportunity to travel more. My philosophy now is - Do what you can, while you can. My other interests are fine wines and keeping fit. These may not complement each other but keep me happy.
This entry was posted in Crosby Rambling Club, Lake District, Landscape, Photography, Walks. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Brunt Knott and Ulgraves.

  1. This looks a lovely walk Alan, maybe we could get a gym walk in shortly doing something/somewhere similar?

  2. Marie says:

    Interesting walk and photos very different from last week in Austria.

  3. David says:

    Nice photos, Alan. I particularly like the shot of the reflected cloud in Gunall Dubs,

  4. crosbyman66 says:

    Thanks David. It was a very photogenic spot and the conditions were perfect.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s