Loadpot Hill

The Chimney on Loadpot Hill

                                              Panoramic view of the Chimney on Loadpot Hill.

Yesterday Les, Chris and I did the recce for Crosby Rambling Club. Our destination was Pooley Bridge and we were looking for a walk of approximately 12 miles.

It was not easy to put together a circular walk that was different to what we had done previously, but we headed out from Pooley Bridge following the bridleway towards Helton. It was easy walking but we still had to avoid the wet bits.

At an unfenced road we turned right to follow the tarmac  to Scales Farm.The next section crossing Heltondale beck looked complicated on the map but was actually quite simple following the footpath signs. We even saw a signpost pointing to Loadpot Hill our intended destination. We were on our way, however things soon got interesting. Passing through a gate we knew we had to go left but there was no sign of a path. The bracken was shoulder height and I could just about make out Les who was leading.

Emerging from the bracken onto open moorland we were looking for the bridleway leading to Loadpot Hill. There was no trace of any path so we walked across the  moor on GPS and compass bearings.

Looking back we could see faint signs of a path but I think these were the marks just left by us. The ‘path’ led to the Col between Loadpot Hill and Wether Hill but we eventually veered off to the right to head directly for the summit of Loadpot Hill. 2201 ft.

                                                           Alan at the summit of Loadpot Hill

Should we now make a diversion to take in Wether Hill which is slightly higher at 2210 ft.

We were undecided whether to do it or not.

We looked at the weather which was getting increasingly murky and decided against it.

Oh, the joys of the English language.

As a compromise we walked down to the Chimney. This was the chimney of Lowther House, a former shooting lodge. In the drawing in Wainwright’s book The Far Eastern Fells, it looks quite impressive but the book was written in 1956 and all that remains now is a small pile of stones.

We now headed north along the old Roman Road of High Street before branching off to our left to visit the summit of Arthur’s Pike, 1747 ft. The weather had improved and the views were opening up, plus at last we could see the lake.

It was now downhill all the way back to Pooley Bridge. Just a simple matter of following the path down Barton Fell, crossing the beck and retracing our outward route back into Pooley Bridge. We now made the mistake of ‘switching off’. We have all done it. I think I was dreaming of the pint at the end of the walk. W turned left without checking our grid reference and went happily on along the path towards Howtown. Fortunately we realised our mistake fairly quickly and soon were back on track.Good job it was only the recce.

Today we did 13.4 miles including one or two diversions, both planned and unplanned. On the day we should be able to get it down to 12 miles.

Loadpot Hill was my 104th Wainwright, only another 110 to go. I climbed my first one in 1984 so at this rate I will be 100 when I complete them. What a way to celebrate your 100th birthday. Cutting the cake on top of Scafell.

It’s nice to dream.

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About crosbyman66

My aim is to create a photo diary of my walks and my travels. I have two main hobbies, walking and photography and these complement each other. I am a senior citizen, what used to be called an old age pensioner, but I don't feel old. Since retirement I have had more time to pursue my hobbies and the opportunity to travel more. My philosophy now is - Do what you can, while you can. My other interests are fine wines and keeping fit. These may not complement each other but keep me happy.
This entry was posted in Adventures with Les, Industrial Heritage, Lake District, Photography, Walks. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Loadpot Hill

  1. MrsBoardwell says:

    What a lovely thought – reaching your goal at age 100 & and cutting a piece of cake on Scafell. I hope you do!

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